50+ Ways to Enjoy Your Favorite Summer Berries

An abundance of fresh berries is certainly one of the best things about summertime in the Midwest. Many hot afternoons during summers I spent in Michigan were devoted to collecting sweet, ripe berries for eating and using fresh and for preserving to enjoy during the long, cold winter months.

This recipe round up features fifty-two delicious ways to enjoy a variety of summer berries this year. Below you’ll find some classic recipes you know and love mixed in with some fresh, fun recipes that just might become your new summer favorite. Enjoy!

Breakfast & Brunch

1. Blueberry Basil Muffins from Oh My Veggies

blueberry_basil_muffins

2. Triple Berry Baked Oatmeal from Happy Healthy Momma

3. Chévre & Blackberry Doughnuts from Bakeaholic Momma

4. Raspberry Breakfast Bowls from Pinch of Yum

5. Strawberry and Yogurt Bran Muffins from Dishing Up the Dirt

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Holistic Treatment of Poison Ivy, Oak & Sumac Rash

Photo Credit: WebMD

If you live in the United States (or parts of Canada), there’s a good chance that you are all too familiar with the effects of a run in with poison ivy, oak, or sumac. These plants contain an oil called urushiol (you-ROO-shee-all) that causes an itchy, blistering rash when it comes in contact with the skin. This rash often goes away within a few weeks, but can cause a lot of misery in the meantime. Try the following suggestions to avoid getting poison ivy, oak, or sumac this summer.

Preventative Measures

If you live in an area where one or more of these plants grow, learning to identify them is an important first step to avoiding exposure in the first place. Once you know these plants, be careful to respect them and keep your distance.

Poison ivy, oak, and sumac grow prolifically and vigorously throughout the United States. The below images from poison-ivy.org map out specific areas where you can expect to find each of these plants.


This PDF from Michigan herbalist, jim mcdonald, is helpful for learning to ID poison ivy. Poison-ivy.org also offers information on identifying the different types of poison ivy, oak, and sumac.

You can sometimes prevent an outbreak of a urushiol rash by washing well with fels naphtha soap. (You can find it online or in grocery or drug stores.) Try this if you have been walking or working in an area where poison ivy, oak, or sumac grows. The sooner you do this after possible exposure the better. It takes about 12 to 72 hours for a rash to form after coming into contact with the plant, so you will want to wash off the urushiol oils long before then to avoid an outbreak.

If you do end up with a rash from exposure to poison ivy, oak, or sumac, the following holistic treatment plan can help speed recovery time and reduce symptoms, without the use of conventional medications, such as antihistamines and steroids.


Cleanse & Support the Liver

The liver plays an important role in cleansing the blood and ridding it of metabolic wastes and environmental toxins. An unhealthy liver that isn’t functioning properly can cause issues with kidney, heart, skin, respiratory, and glandular functions. Thus, when skin problems manifest, it is important to boost liver health as support therapy to help the body regain balance.

The following regime will help improve liver health:

Liver Cleansing Tea

  • 3 parts dandelion root
  • 2 parts burdock root
  • 2 parts cinnamon
  • 2 parts licorice root
  • 1 part pau du arco
  • 1/2 part yellow dock
  • 1/4 part echinacea

Combine about 3 tablespoons of the above herb mixture per quart of water in a saucepan. Bring the mixture slowly to a boil, then simmer gently for 20-45 minutes. Then remove from heat and strain the herbs from your tea. Drink 2-3 cups daily.

 

Liver Tonic Tea

  • 3 parts peppermint
  • 2 parts lemon balm
  • 2 parts red clover blossom
  • 2 parts nettle
  • 1 part alfalfa
  • 1/2 part parsley
  • 1/4 part stevia

Add 1-3 tablespoons of above herb mixture to a strainer or tea ball and place in a cup. Bring water to a boil. Pour hot water over herbs and cover. Let infuse 15 minutes to an hour and then strain out herbs. Drink 2-3 cups daily.

Switch to a Cleansing Diet

To support the body during flares of any skin related problems, the diet should be cleansing and eliminative in nature.

Eat light simple foods, including:

  • Miso
  • Vegetable broth
  • Millet
  • Brown rice
  • Tofu
  • Steamed veggies

Avoid:

  • Sweets, chocolate, and foods high in sugar (even fruit and juice)
  • Alcohol
  • Fatty foods
  • Large or complex meals
  • Processed or refined foods

 

Relieve Stress & Support the Nervous System 

Supporting the nervous system is especially important during flares of skin issues, like poison ivy, oak, or sumac, as the rash and itching can cause stress and increased inflammation.

Try one or more of the following to help soothe nerves and reduce irritation.

Peppermint-Valerian Tea

  • 2 parts peppermint
  • 1 part valerian
  • 1 part milky oats and/or oat straw
  • 1 part licorice root

Combine water and licorice root in a saucepan. Bring the mixture slowly to a boil, then simmer gently for 15 minutes. Remove from heat, add other herbs, and let infuse for 45 minutes. You’ll want to use about 3 tablespoons (total) of herbal blend per quart of water. Strain the herbs from your tea. Drink as often as needed throughout the day.

Nerve Soothing Tea

  • 3 parts chamomile
  • 2 parts lemon balm
  • 1 part milky oats and/or oat straw
  • 1 part lavender

Add 1-3 tablespoons of above herb mixture to a strainer or tea ball and place in a cup. Bring water to a boil. Pour hot water over herbs and cover. Let infuse 15 minutes to an hour and then strain out herbs. Drink as often as needed.

Valerian tincture

Take 1-2 teaspoons diluted in water or tea 3 times daily or as often as needed.

Skullcap tincture

Take 1/4 tsp diluted in water or tea 3 times daily.

Reduce Further Irritation

Dealing with poison ivy, oak, and sumac rashes can be pretty miserable. Do yourself a favor and don’t make things worse! Try the following suggestions to avoid further exacerbation.

  • Avoid hot showers, water, & heat. For a relieving soak, add baking soda to lukewarm bath water.
  • Avoid oil based treatments, like salves and ointments.


Internal & External Treatment

The following natural treatments will help to dry up poison ivy, oak, or sumac rashes, relieve itching, and speed recovery.

  • Drink drying, astringent teas of mugwort, oak bark, or witch hazel.
  • Mix clay with enough apple cider vinegar to form a paste. Spread into the affected area and let dry. Rinse with cool water.
  • Apply yogurt to affected areas. It is slightly astringent and drying. It is also a good option for topical treatment for the skin around the eyes, as other treatments may be too harsh.
  • Dilute the below linament with a little cool water and apply to affected area.

The following recipe is adapted from Back to Eden by Jethro Kloss.
Jethro Kloss’ Herbal Linament

  • 1 oz golden seal root
  • 1 oz myrrh gum
  • 1/4 oz cayenne
  • 1 pint rubbing alcohol

Combine ingredients in a glass jar with a lid that fits tightly. Cover and let sit in a warm place for 2 weeks or more, shaking daily. After 2 weeks, strain well and store in a glass jar.

  • Mix green clay, sea salt, & water till a paste forms. Stir in a few drops of pure peppermint essential oil. Apply to affected area as needed. Store in a glass jar with a tight fitting lid.
  • Apply the following tincture to affected areas frequently.

Poison Ivy/Oak Tincture
Fill a jar with wilted fresh mugwort and cover with apple cider vinegar. Cover jar and put in a warm place, out of direct sunlight for 14 days. Then strain and add 2 tablespoons of salt per pint of tincture.

To use: dilute a small amount with water and apply as needed.

 

The consequences of a too close encounter with poison ivy, oak, or sumac can certainly be uncomfortable, however, hopefully with increased care and awareness when working or walking in areas where these plants grow can help to reduce these types of run ins for you in the future. And if you do end up with a poison ivy, oak, or sumac rash, it is nice to know that there are natural options for treatments, as antihistamine and steroid medications can often have unpleasant side effects.

If you’re struggling with why “pesky” plants like poison ivy even exist, you may want to check out this short video featuring jim mcdonald. He offers a more positive point of view on poison ivy that may be helpful to you. Best of luck this season as you share the woods and fields with these powerful plants!

Have a favorite natural remedy for poison ivy, oak, or sumac that I didn’t mention? Let us know in the comments below!

 

[RESOURCES]
Gladstar, Rosemary. “Herbal First Aide: Skin Problems and What to Do About Them.”

Gladstar, Rosemary. “Herbal Therapeutics for the Liver.”

Kloss, Jethro. Back to Eden.

Poison ivy, oak, and sumac.” American Academy of Dermatology. 6/21/2017.

Tierra, Michael. The Way of Herbs.

The Incredible Nettle


Nettle (Urtica dioica), also known as Stinging Nettle, is a lovely plant that is is a favorite if many an herbalist (including myself!). It sometimes gets a bad reputation because its stems and leaves are covered in small, sharp spurs that can cause severe irritation and pain on areas of skin that come in contact with the plant. However, despite its sting, nettle is a valuable wonderful medicinal and a tasty, nutritious edible. There’s much to love about this wonderful herb!

Nettle grows in temperate regions all over the world. The entire plant can be utilized for food or medicine. Young nettle leaves can be cooked and eaten like spinach. (Old plants may cause kidney damage when eaten raw.) Nettle is a valuable edible, as it is an excellent source of vitamins- including A, C, D and K- and minerals, like choline, lecithin, silica, and iron. The aerial parts are utilized for teas and tinctures and the roots are medicinal.

For some tasty ideas of how to add more nettle to your diet, check out these recipes:

Note: If eating nettles sounds a little dangerous to you, never fear – the plant loses its sting once it is dried or cooked. But, you may want to wear gloves while harvesting nettle and preparing any recipes with nettle to avoid getting stung during those processes. 

Nettle Beer from The Herbal Academy

Nettle Garlic Buttermilk Biscuits from Mountain Rose Herbs Blog

Stinging Nettle Spanikopita from Join Me For Dinner

Nettle Pesto Pasta with Sun-Dried Tomatoes from The Bojon Gourmet

Nettle Chips from Mountain Rose Herbs Blog

Stinging Nettle Lasagna from Learning Herbs

Ali Baba’s Savory Stinging Nettle Muffins from Palachink

Garlic Cream & Nettle Pizza from Food & Wine

Wild Weed Frittata from Mountain Rose Herbs Blog

Nettle-Mushroom Pie with Pine Nuts from Voodoo & Sauce

Stinging Nettle Ravioli with Butter & Sage from La Tavola Marche

Hungry for more ways to enjoy nettle? Check out these 12 stinging nettle recipes from The Herbal Academy.

In addition to being a delicious and healthful edible, nettle is also a wonderful medicinal plant. It is a general toning herb that strengthens and nourishes the whole body, balances metabolic function, and improves circulation. It has been used traditionally as a cleansing herb because of its ability to aid elimination of waste from the body.

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A Holistic Treatment Plan for Seasonal Allergies

If you suffer from seasonal allergies, you know how frustrating the symptoms can be. Dealing with running, itchy eyes and nose, sneezing, coughing, and wheezing can make life very uncomfortable and unfortunately, prescription allergy medications can leave you feeling groggy and tired. There are ways, however, to treat allergies holistically. The results are not immediately effective, however, when the treatments are done faithfully, the result is permanent relief from seasonal allergies and better health overall.

PREVENTATIVE PROGRAM

It is best to start this part of the treatment when you are having the least amount symptoms, well before the onset of an acute allergic reaction. Continue the below program for 6 months to a year.

Support the Liver with Diet & Herbs
Allergies occur when the liver over reacts to foreign protein bodies in the environment, including things like plant pollens, dust, animal hairs, chemicals, foods, and cosmetics. Usually, this hypersensitivity to environmental factors is caused by a weakness or breakdown somewhere in our internal system.

If cellular wastes are not being efficiently broken down or eliminated, they build up and begin to weaken internal tissues and organs. This excess protein build up in the blood triggers white blood cell activity, which activates other defense systems in the body. This creates a state of chronic low level agitation in the body that makes it hypersensitive to foreign proteins, also known as antigens.

When an antigen enters the blood stream, the body produces antibodies to “protect” itself. This reaction causes the production of histamine, which is toxic to membranes. This substance causes blood vessels to dilate and makes them more permeable. Histamine is responsible for causing allergy symptoms, like swelling of the mucous membranes in the nose, eyes, and lungs, and the contraction of air passages that results in wheezing and edema.

The liver is responsible for deactivating poisonous substances in the body, even those that the body itself creates. When the liver is healthy, it is able to produce an enzyme, histaminases, which is a natural antihistamine. However, when the liver is stressed, it can not produce enough histaminases to eliminate the histamine the body produced and allergy symptoms continue. Thus, a healthy liver is crucial to being able to eliminate allergies.
Because the liver plays such an important role in the allergic process, the first step to treating hay fever and getting rid of allergies is cleansing and toning the liver.

Diet

Most liver imbalances can be classified as deficiencies or excesses. A person who suffers from hay fever tends to be liver deficient.

In this case, the liver function is slow and weak. Cellular wastes are not properly eliminated, and the body is polluted with its own toxic metabolic wastes (as described above). A liver deficiency results in poor use of ingested nutrients and inefficient uptake of the proteins and cholesterol the body needs to regenerate cells. Diet is crucial to helping to improve the health of the liver and establish balance in the body.

Deficient livers are often caused by a diet that includes too many simple carbohydrates and not enough quality protein and fats. Usually, too much emphasis has been put on raw, or cold “yin” type foods; dairy, fruits, and carbs. So in general, a corrective diet for a liver deficient person should include more high quality proteins, fats & oils, and warming foods, as well as:

  • dark leafy greens
  • fresh sprouts – especially clover, fenugreek & alfalfa
  • fresh, steamed vegetables – especially beets and other root veggies
  • whole grains
  • seeds – especially sesame
  • raw almonds
  • fresh, alkalizing fruits, like lemon & grapefrui

Foods to Avoid 

  • alcohol
  • cold drinks and foods
  • fried, fatty, oily foods
  • dairy
  • food preservatives and additives
  • sweets, sugar, and fruit juices
  • raw fruits and vegetables

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Ode to Beets: 150+ Reasons to Love this Root Veggie

Beets, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways. 

Beets are definitely one of my favorite vegetables. One of the most amazing things about them is how good they are for your health. They are loaded with nutrients and are an excellent source of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, folate, magnesium, iron, copper, & phosphorus. They also provide fiber and antioxidants.

This root veggie also has some medicinal benefits. It helps to cleanse the liver and can be helpful for promoting healthy digestion. Because beets contain nitrates they aid in improving blood flow, lowering blood pressure, and can even boost stamina so you can excerise longer. They also contain betaine, an anti-inflammatory amino acid that helps to protect the body from environmental stress.

Beets contain several minerals that are essential to healthy nerve and muscle function and promote bone, liver, pancreas,and kidney health. They also contain B vitamin folate, which helps reduce the risk of birth defects.

Beet greens are extremely healthy too. They are an important source of essential nutrients, like vitamin B6, potassium, magnesium, vitamin A, vitamin C, and calcium. They also contain more iron than spinach and are a good source of fiber and protein.

In addition to being super healthy, beets are also really tasty and versatile. They are a great addition to soups, pastas, salads, juices, smoothies, and even make lovely desserts and condiments.

Below are 150 recipes to help you fall in love with beets. If you’re already a beet lover, some of these recipes may be familiar, but there’s also a lot of fun, unique recipes that will have you wanting to eat beets for breakfast, lunch & dinner. Enjoy!

[BREAKFAST]

1. Beet Hashbrowns from The Roasted Root

Photo Credit: The Roasted Root

2. Beet & Chia Pancakes from The New York Times

3. Chocolate Beet Muffins from Cake Student

4. Beet Hash Breakfast Wraps from Reclaiming Provincial

Photo credit: Reclaiming Provincial

5. Pink Breakfast Bowl from Ricki Heller

6. Roasted Beet, Baby Spinach & Goat Cheese Quiche from Food52

7. Red Flannel Hash Cakes from Martha Stewart

8. Beet & Carrot Muffins from Hidden Ponies

9. Breakfast Beet Shakshuka from The Whole Tara

Photo Credit: The Whole Tara

10. Beet Crust Leek Quiche from Prevention

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Herbs for A Healthy Pregnancy

Herbs are a lovely, natural way to support mom and baby during pregnancy. They can help provide important vitamins and minerals, ease morning sickness, relieve stress, and help to level out mood swings.

The following tea blend is one that herbalist , Rosemary Gladstar, recommends for pregnant mothers. It is tasty and nourishing. This blend can be enjoyed throughout pregnancy to provide essential nutrients, strengthen muscles used during childbirth, ease stress, and gently boost energy levels.

Pregnancy Tea 

  • 4 parts peppermint or spearmint
  • 3 parts raspberry leaf
  • 3 parts lemongrass
  • 2 parts nettle
  • 2 parts oat straw
  • 2 parts strawberry leaf
  • 1 part comfrey leaf
  • Optional: a pinch of stevia

[TONICS]

Tonic herbs strengthen and improve general, overall health and vitality of the whole body or in some cases, a specific body system. They are gentle enough to be used often over an extended period of time, and in fact, often work best when used regularly.

Raspberry (Rubus)
Raspberry leaf is a safe and widely used herb for supporting pregnancy. Prepared as an infusion,* it makes a lovely uterine and general pregnancy tonic. It can be used regularly throughout pregnancy to nourish mother and baby and to strengthen the muscles used during childbirth.

The leaves of raspberry contain an alkaloid called fragrine, which helps to tone the muscles of the pelvis and uterus. It is also rich in vitamins and minerals, including vitamins A, B complex, C, & E; phosphorus, potassium and iron. The infusion of raspberry leaf also contains calcium in its most absorbable form. The uptake of this mineral is further enhanced by the aforementioned phosphorus, vitamin A & C contained in the leaf.

The regular use of this tonic herb is especially beneficial before and during pregnancy. Prior to conception, raspberry leaf combined with red clover blossoms can help to improve fertility in both men and women. During pregnancy, it can help to ease morning sickness by gently relieving an upset stomach and nausea.
If taken throughout pregnancy, Rubus helps to tone the uterus, which helps prevent miscarriage and postpartum hemorrhage. During childbirth, this toning allows the uterus to contract more effectively, which may make birth faster and easier. Also, because it strengthens the muscles used during labor and delivery, regular use of raspberry leaf during pregnancy can reduce labor pains and healing time after birth.
Raspberry leaf can also be beneficial after the baby is born. The high mineral content of this herb often helps the mother’s body to produce enough breast milk. However, since it is slightly astringent, some mothers may actually experience the opposite effect.

Nettle (Urtica dioica)
Nettle is a wonderfully nourishing tonic herb, especially during pregnancy. It has a high chlorophyll content compared to other herbs and is source of nearly every vitamin and mineral that is known to be needed for human development. It is rich in vitamins A, C, D, & K; calcium, potassium, phosphorus, iron, and sulfur.
Nettle is easy to enjoy. The infusion* is deep and rich tasting. It is also a delicious spring edible in temperate zones. If you’re lucky enough to live in warmer climates, it can be eaten year round.
There are many benefits to regular consumption of nettle before and during pregnancy. Before pregnancy, nettles help to improve fertility in both men and women.

During pregnancy, this herb helps to provide essential nutrients for mother and baby. Nettle infusions supply readily absorbable phosphorus, calcium, and vitamins A & D.

Nettles also help to ease leg cramps and other muscle spasms. Since this herb is mildly astringent and generally nourishing, it strengthens the blood vessels can help to reduce hemorrhoids. Additionally, nettles tone and strengthen the kidneys, which have to cleanse 150% of the normal blood flow during most of pregnancy.
Regular use of nettle throughout pregnancy helps to reduce pain during and after childbirth because it is high in easily assimilated calcium, which reduces muscles pains in the uterus, legs, and other areas. It also is an excellent source of vitamin K and increases the amount hemoglobin that is available, both of which help to decrease the risk of bleeding postpartum. In case bleeding after birth does occur, drinking fresh nettle in teaspoon doses will help to slow it. After birth, nettle helps mothers produce rich, abundant breast milk.

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Make Your Own Herbal First Aid Kit

We all know that life is extremely unpredictable. One minute you’re happily cutting food for your rabbits and the next thing you know you’re staring dazed at your finger thats now dripping with blood after a too close encounter with your pruning shears.

Even if you aren’t quite as accident prone as I am, things happen and its nice to be prepared when they do. Having a well stocked first aid kit in your home and with you when you travel is a great way to be ready for whatever issues may arise. If you get anxious when you travel, knowing that you are well prepared in case of illness or injury can be a good way to relieve some of your stress.

The following is a list of things in my personal first aid kit. Feel free to make substitutions or omit things based on what is available and makes the most sense for your needs. Some of these remedies are somewhat specific for travelers, so you may choose not to include them in your home medicine cabinet.

Tinctures

Tinctures are a really handy on-the-go herbal preparation, especially if you store them in dropper bottles. I like to store all of my tincture bottles in a small ziplock bag in case of spills. If you’re traveling with glass bottles, you’ll want to pad them somehow to prevent them from breaking.

These are the herbal tinctures in my first aid kit:

Echinacea – This cleansing, immune boosting, antibiotic, and antiviral herb is a great addition to any medicine cabinet. The tincture can be used topically to disinfect cuts and scrapes. It can be taken internally to help treat colds, flus, food poisoning, and bacterial infections. Herbalist, Rosemary Gladstar, recommends taking a dropperful of tincture every 3-4 hours at the first sign of illness (sore throat, cough, fatigue, etc.) until symptoms subside.

Echinacea can also be used preventatively prior to leaving home to prevent illness if you tend to get sick when traveling. Gladstar recommends taking a dropperful 2-3 times daily for three days before traveling and three days after arriving at your destination to boost and support immune function.

Digestive Bitters – This tincture is an invaluable remedy to have on hand for a wide variety of stomach issues. Digestive bitters tincture aids digestion, relieves gas & bloating, and can be helpful for nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

You’ll find more information about bitters and how to make your own tincture in my post, Digestive Bitters.

Valerian – This is one of my favorite herbs for a variety of issues that may arise during travel. It is sedative, pain relieving, and soothing to the nervous system. It’s a valuable sleep aid, helps relieve muscle spasms, calms overexcitement, and is good for general pain relief.

While many people find valerian to be relaxing, a small percentage of people actually experience a stimulating effect from this herb. If you haven’t taken valerian before, try a small dose to see how it will affect you.

Typical dosing: 10 drops to 1 tsp for insomnia, stress, pain, menstrual cramps, aching muscles.

St. John’s wort – This herb is helpful in with general pain relief. It has properties that aids wounded tissues in their recovery. It is an anti-inflammatory. It also aids in recovery of mental/emotional balance after suffering trauma.

Typical dosing: 10-30 drops for nerve pain, depression, anxiety, or burns.

Ginkgo-Hawthorne – This herbal combination can ease the symptoms of jet lag and can also help treat altitude sickness. Gladstar recommends taking 1/2 to 1 tsp of tincture 3 times daily for several days before and after traveling to help prevent jet lag. Avoid taking ginkgo if you take blood thinning medications.

Capsules

Capsules are another herbal preparation that is very convenient for travel. You can often find herbal capsules in health food stores and even some pharmacies. Mountain Rose Herbs is another great source.

If you’re going to be using a lot of capsules, it’s probably worth it to buy your own capsule machine and empty capsules so you can fill them with your own powdered herbs. This will save you money and also allows you to make customized herbal blends to fill your capsules with.

If you’re not assembling this first aid kit for travel and just want to have a well stocked medicine cabinet at your home, you may want to keep loose dried herbs on hand instead of capsules. It can be cheaper and it’s really not that inconvenient to make a cup of tea when you’re at home. Do whatever works best for you and your family.

The following capsules are in my first aid kit:

Ginger – This herb is helpful for cases of nausea, motion sickness, and helps to calm stomach issues caused by stress and anxiety. It’s warming properties also make it helpful for several other issues travelers might find themselves dealing with, like menstrual issues (especially cramps), coughs, sore throats, and colds.

Activated charcoal – Internally, this powder helps to absorb a variety of toxins from the digestive tract, including many chemicals, poisons, and pathogens that cause food and water bourne illnesses.

It also can be used externally to treat spider bites or help to draw out splinters. Just break open a capsule and mix the contents with a very small amount of water to make a paste. Smooth the paste over the affected area and let dry. Remove with a cloth dipped in warm water.

White willow bark – Willow is a natural source of salicin, the active ingredient in aspirin. It is useful as an anti-inflammatory and all-purpose pain reliever. It can also be useful for treatment of occasional headaches. Standard dosing: 2 capsules with food.

Cranberry – Cranberry capsules are an invaluable remedy to have on hand if you’re prone to bladder or urinary tract infections. Start taking capsules in large doses at the first sign of infection. This can help stop a bladder infection that is just starting.

Essential Oils

Lavender essential oil – Lavender has a wide variety of uses and is very gentle. It’s antiseptic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and calming.

Dab a drop of essential oil on your finger and rub on temples and behind ears to soothe headaches caused by stress and tension or to help calm nerves in stressful situations. This method is also helpful for cases of insomnia.

Lavender EO can also be used topically to promote healing and reduce pain or itching in bruises, burns, wounds, and insect bites. Apply a few drops to affected area to soothe and help prevent infection. For burns, mix a few drops of oil with a tablespoon of honey to make a healing, antiseptic dressing.

Peppermint essential oil – This stimulating essential oil is uplifting, energizing and has a variety of first aid uses.

For upset stomach and digestive issues, add 3 to 4 drops of pure essential oil to a cup of warm water and drink.

For headaches caused by fatigue, put a few drops on a towel or cloth and inhale deeply. Or mix 6-10 drops of peppermint oil with a carrier oil (like olive, sunflower, or coconut oil) and massage onto back of the neck.

For relief from painful insect bites or stings, apply a drop or 2 of essential oil directly onto the affected area.

For burns, mix a few drops with a tablespoon of honey to make an antiseptic, anti-inflammatory dressing.

Tea tree essential oil – Tea tree is a powerful antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, and antifungal. The essential oil of this herb is very versatile and can be used to treat a variety of issues that may arise on your travels.

To relieve symptoms of sinus & bronchial infections, and colds, put 10-15 drops in a bowl or pot of hot water. Drape a towel over your head and the bowl and steam for 8-10 minutes. Or if an herbal steam isn’t practical, try put a few drops of tea tree essential oil on a cloth or towel, hold over your nose and breathe in deeply.

For fungal infections and rashes, apply a few drops directly to the affected area.

To ease tooth and gum infections, mix 2 drops of tea tree essential oil with 1/4 teaspoon of goldenseal powder and apply to infected area. Do not ingest tea tree oil.

To remove embedded ticks, put a drop of tea tree EO on the butt of the tick.

For wounds, cuts, or insect bites, apply to affected area to prevent infection.

Other

Kloss linament – This traditional remedy is helpful for topical treatment of muscle inflammation, insect bites, scratches, wounds, boils, pimples, infected rashes, splinters, and poison oak/ivy. It should be used only externally.

The following recipe is adapted from Back to Eden by Jethro Kloss.

Jethro Kloss’ Herbal Linament

  • 1 oz golden seal root
  • 1 oz myrrh gum
  • 1/4 oz cayenne
  • 1 pint rubbing alcohol

Combine ingredients in a glass jar with a lid that fits tightly. Cover and let sit in a warm place for 2 weeks or more, shaking daily.

After 2 weeks, strain well and store in a glass jar. Apply to affected area to relieve any of conditions listed above. This remedy will sting when applied to broken skin. Dilute with water for use on animals and children.

Lipbalm 

Sunscreen

Insect Repellent 

Supplies

Every good first aid kit will also include the following items to help sanitize and bandage wounds or stabilize injuries.

  • Tweezers
  • Scissors
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Gauze
  • Band aids
  • Steri-Strips
  • Cotton swabs
  • Cotton pads
  • Ace wrap
  • Athletic tape
  • Moleskin

Enjoy putting together your own herbal first aid kit. Being prepared for injury and illness can help relieve some of the stress of travel and will help your trip go smoother if an accident occurs or if you fall ill away from home.

Have a favorite first aid herb I didn’t mention? I’d love to hear about it in the comments below!
[RESOURCES:]

7Song. “Wilderness Herbal First Aid.” http://www.7song.com.

7Song. “Herbal First Aid: Protocols, Pain remedies, Wound care and Street Medicine.” http://www.7song.com.

7Song. “Herbal First Aid: Wound Care.” http://www.7song.com.

Gladstar, Rosemary. Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health. 

Gladstar, Rosemary. “Herbs for the Traveler.”

Hoffman, David. Medical Herbalism.

Kloss, Jethro. Back to Eden.

Tierra, Michael. The Way of Herbs.

Weed, Susan. Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year. 

100+ Homemade Christmas Gift Ideas

One of my favorite parts of the holiday season is making gifts for my friends and family. Homemade gifts are easily customized to fit the tastes of the recipient and are a truly unique and special way to celebrate Christmas.

This DIY gift round up is sure to give you plenty of ideas for everyone on your list this year.

Gifts to Pamper:

1. Coconut Mango Butter Lip Balm from The Nerdy Farmwife

2. Beach Waves Hair Spray from Wellness Mama

3. Oil Cleansing Facial Bars from My Healthy Green Family

Photo credit: My Healthy Green Family

4. Herbal Mud Mask from The Hippy Homemaker
5. Sweet Lime Lip Scrub from Mountain Rose Herbs Blog

Photo Credit: Mountain Rose Herbs

6. Elderflower Eye Cream from Joybilee Farm
7. Sweet Orange & Rose Perfume from The Herbal Academy

8. Basil Anti-Aging Face Cream from The Nerdy Farmwife

9. Natural Makeup from Wellness Mama

10. Massage Oil from the Mountain Rose Herbs Blog

11. Aloe Mint Lotion from The Nerdy Farmwife

12. Calendula Sugar Scrub from The Herbal Academy

13. Green Tea Skin Serum from the Mountain Rose Herbs blog

Photo Credit: Mountain Rose Herbs

14. Aromatherapy Shower Steamers from The Hippy Homemaker

15. Lavender Cardamom Bath Salts from Shalom Mama

16. Cacao & Vanilla Body Polish from the Mountain Rose Herbs blog

17. Gingersnap Facemask from Growing Up Herbal

18. Honey Body Wash from DIY Natural

Photo Credit: DIY Natural

19. Beard Oil from from Mountain Rose Herbs Blog

20. Buckwheat Relaxation Pillows from Wellness Mama

21. Peppermint Tea Tree Aftershave from The Hippy Homemaker

22. Lotion Bars from Wellness Mama

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Herbal Dream Pillows & Tea


Throughout history, dreams have had a special significance in many cultures. There is written record of dream interpretations dating back to over 5,000 years old. Ancient Egyptians, for example, highly valued dreams, especially vivid ones, as they believed they were messages from the gods. The ancient Greeks also felt that dreams were divine messages and used interpretations of their dreams to help them make decisions, predict the future, and solve problems.
Today, dreams are still a bit of a mystery to us. Some researchers claim that they help to store memories, while others feel that they are important for resolving conflicts and regulating mood. While the specific benefits of dreams are still uncertain, it is clear that healthy sleep patterns are important to health and well being.

Insomnia and difficulty with dream recall can make it hard to benefit from sleep and dreams. Herbal dream pillows and teas, however, promote vivid dreams, peaceful sleep, and dream recall. They are simple to make and are a natural, non-habit forming way to promote healthy sleep and dream cycles.

The herbs in these dream blends are naturally calming and dream boosting. Mugwort is used to enhance and promote lucid dreams. It has also traditionally been used for protection and was woven into necklaces by Native Americans to help keep away dreams about the dead.

Lavender and chamomile are calming herbs. They promote relaxation and restful sleep. Passion flower is soothing and naturally reduces stress. It aids in easing anxiety and quieting a busy or worried mind.

Oats are a natural sedative and are well-loved by herbalists for their soothing effect on the nervous system. They have been used traditionally to help calm anxiety and alleviate insomnia.

 

Dream Pillows

Ingredients:

  • 3 parts lavender
  • 3 parts roses
  • 2 parts mugwort
  • 1 part chamomile
  • 1 part rosemary
  • 1/2 part eucalyptus

Directions:

Combine all dry herbs in a large bowl and mix well. Scoop this herbal mixture into pouches sewed from fabric scraps of your choosing. Sew the pouch closed.

To use: tuck the herb sachet under your pillow to promote peaceful sleep and enhance dreams. Drink a cup of sweet dreams tea before bed for an added effect.

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Lavender-Lime Infused Vinegar

Vinegars are wonderfully versatile and have long been appreciated for their ability to clean and disinfect surfaces and to preserve and enhance food. They also have many health benefits and can be infused with a variety of herbs for more specific medicinal or practical uses.

Infused vinegars are simple to make and can be customized to serve many different purposes. They are a tasty addition to salad dressings, soups, and sauces. They can be used in your beauty routine to help balance skin and hair. They are also a safe and effective alternative to conventional cleaning products.

This recipe is best suited as an ingredient in an all-purpose household cleaner, though it certainly can be consumed as well (and is quite tasty!). It utilizes white vinegar, which has antibacterial and antifungal properties and works well to remove stains and odors from a variety of surfaces. 

Lime is a disinfectant that kills bacteria and viruses, making it a great addition to a cleaning spray. The naturally occurring acids in citrus also help to cut grease and remove stains. Lavender adds a lovely smell to the vinegar and is naturally antibacterial, antimicrobial, and antiseptic. 


Ingredients:

  • Lime peels 
  • White Vinegar
  • Fresh lavender sprigs 

Directions:

Fill a jar with lime peels. Don’t pack the jar too tightly, the peels will need to be able to move freely in the vinegar to infuse well. Add the sprigs of lavender and pour vinegar over top to fill the jar. Cap tightly with a lid. (If your lid is metal, placing a square of parchment paper between the lid and the rim of the jar can help prevent corrosion.) 

Let infuse for 2-3 weeks, shaking the jar daily. Then, strain through a mesh strainer or cheese cloth and rebottle.

To make an all purpose cleaner with your vinegar you will need:

  • 1 part lavender-lime infused white vinegar
  • 1/2 to 1 part water 
  • essential oils, if desired

Combine ingredients in a spray bottle and use to clean and disinfect surfaces, neutralize odors, and remove stains.
Other ingredients that make great additions to infused vinegars that are to be used for cleaning and disenfecting purposes are thyme, tea tree, basil, eucalyptus, oregano, sage, rosemary, and lemon. 

Enjoy infusing your own vinegars for your culinary and household needs. I’d love to hear about any of your favorite combinations in the comments section below!